Plymouth

This post brings us into the Lakes Region to explore Plymouth, New Hampshire! I knew this was the home of Plymouth State University but I was looking forward to seeing what else makes Plymouth unique. There are many things to love about this area, watch for the 3 things I love about Plymouth bolded in this post.

Routes 4, 118, and 25 provided a scenic ride with more Historical Markers to add to the growing collection.

Enjoy the video collage of my adventures and read the post for links and more information.

Enfield Shaker Museum

Enfield, New Hampshire was one of the stops on my list for a historical marker. A community of around 300 Shakers lived, worshiped, and farmed a 3000-acre section of land in this area from 1793-1923. The Shaker Museum and Mary Keane Chapel are both amazing granite structures.

Enfield Shaker Museum

Enfield, The Enfield Shakers

Plymouth State University

Plymouth State University was my first adventure as I pulled into town. College towns have a certain young and vibrant energy to them and it didn’t take long to feel that as I walked the streets to explore the campus.

One of the first surprises and things I loved about Plymouth were the amazing local historical markers that the Plymouth Historical Society puts out. This one explains how Holmes Plymouth Academy came to be in 1808 and then ultimately evolved into Plymouth State University in 2003.

Holmes Academy

The number of athletic fields told me this was a college that took its sports programs seriously. Check out this athletics link to see their impressive lineup of sports teams.

Here are a few more pictures to give you a feel for the campus and how it integrates with the rest of the town.

Plymouth State University

Plymouth State University

Plymouth State University

Plymouth State University

Plymouth State University

Plymouth State University

Plymouth State University

Baseball Roots

I found this historical nugget by the rotary at the end of Mainstreet! At one point, Draper & Maynard supplied more than 80% of the major league baseball players with gloves made in their plant right in Plymouth. Even Babe Ruth owned a D&E glove!

Draper & Maynard Co. Plymouth, NH

Museum of the White Mountains

The Museum of the White Mountains is located just up the road from the town common. While it was closed at the time due to the January break, it was great to see it and now I know where to go for a future adventure.

Operated by Plymouth State University;

“The mission of the Museum of the White Mountains is to obtain, maintain, and provide access to resources and activities that educate and engage its audience with the region’s artistic, historical, geographic, and cultural treasures.”  

You need to register online if you want to take a tour. The following description copied from their “past exhibitions” page sounds amazing and I would love to make a trip back to experience it:

“NEW HAMPSHIRE NOW: A PHOTOGRAPHIC DIARY OF LIFE IN THE GRANITE STATE”

“Location: Museum of the White Mountains, Main Gallery

Dates: October 1-December 15, 2021

NH NOW is a two-year project to photographically record life in New Hampshire. Nearly 50 photographers traveled throughout the state between 2018 and 2020, making thousands of images that collectively create a twenty-first-century portrait of the people, places, culture, and events in New Hampshire.”

Museum of the White Mountains

Museum of the White Mountains

Museum of the White Mountains

 

 The Town Common

The second surprise and thing I love about Plymouth is its beautiful town common. It hosts a number of historical features that make it unique and I was excited to share them with you.

The Plymouth Historical Society marker “The Common” explains how the park came to be and the history behind the Boy Scout statue in the background. It also references the plaque dedicated to Nathaniel Hawthorne and his relationship with Plymouth. Add in the gazebo grandstand and it makes for a picture-perfect addition for this blog post.

Plymouth Town Common

Nathaniel Hawthorne Tribute

Boy Scout Tribute Plymouth

Smith Covered Bridge

New Hampshire’s covered bridges have always impressed and amazed so my third reason to love Plymouth seemed like an obvious one with Smith Millenium Bridge. The first version of the bridge was constructed in the early 1800s and the current version replaces the one destroyed by fire in 1993.

Smith Millenium Bridge, Plymouth

Smith Millenium Bridge, Plymouth

Downtown Plymouth

Downtown Plymouth has a great mix of stores and restaurants. The main street felt alive and healthy even with the campus fairly quiet over the holiday break.

Part of my efforts with this website revolve around doing what I can to promote New Hampshire businesses. I would encourage you to explore Plymouth’s main street and any of these businesses if you are in the area. View the video above for a more complete view of the shops along the main street.

Downtown Plymouth, NH

Downtown Plymouth, NH

Downtown Plymouth, NH

Downtown Plymouth, NH

Downtown Plymouth, NH

Downtown Plymouth, NH

Downtown Plymouth, NH

Downtown Plymouth, NH

 

I am excited to add Plymouth to my list of adventures! Like most towns and cities I visit, I’m sure there are things that I’ve missed. A return trip for the Museum of the White Mountains and more are on the list for another day. I hope you get a chance to experience Plymouth for yourself. 

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Until next post: “Live Free and Explore!”

New Hampshire Live Free and Explore!

 

3 Comments

  1. masked lady

    Felt like I was right there with you on your trip

    Reply
  2. Aunt Jeanie

    Another interesting and enjoyable post. Looking forward to seeing the next one.

    Reply

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